A cure for morning breath? 

We have all experienced the unpleasant odour of morning breath. Whether it’s you or a partner, we would all appreciate a cure to that embarrassing problem.

Research published from the International Journal of Dental Hygiene has found that drinking or rinsing the mouth with a glass of water could be the cure.

When rinsing or drinking water, a study found this helped remove up to 60% of the substances which cause bad breath. This research shows positive steps towards a cure for morning breath, but we do also need to consider other alternatives that can help.

Michaela ONeill, President of the British Society of Dental Hygiene and Therapy explained: "A glass of water in the morning to help wash away bacteria that cause bad breath is a great way to start the day but people should not consider it the solution.”

Other alternatives that can help cure morning breath include:

Effective oral health routine 

Make sure you have a good daily oral routine that includes brushing your teeth last thing at night and at least one other time during the day, with a fluoride toothpaste. Don't forget to brush your tongue, or use a tongue scraper, to help remove more bacteria.

Regular visits to the dental hygienist 

Dental hygienists can help give advice and tips on how to keep your mouth healthy. Regular cleaning to remove plaque and tarter can help keep your mouth healthy. We recommend visiting a dental hygienist at least every 6 months.

Keep a food diary

If you do suffer from bad breath, keep a diary of all the foods you eat and list any medicines you are taking. Show your diary to your dentist or hygienist, who may be able to suggest ways to solve the problem.

Underlying medical condition 

Bad breath can be a sign of other medical conditions. These include infections in the throat, nose or lungs as well as other conditions including sinusitis, bronchitis, diabetes, or liver or kidney problems.

Water is an essential part of the diet and has many benefits for oral health so having a glass of water in the morning is a good idea; some areas in the UK have fluoridated water which is hugely beneficial to oral health as it helps strengthen tooth enamel.

 

We’d love to hear from you if you have any other tips or advice on avoiding the dreaded morning breath! Contact us or share your ideas with us on Twitter

 

About the author

Barry Tibbott

barry tibbot dental implants

Brunswick Court Dental Practice was established in 1986 as a private practice where Barry is the clinical director.

Involved in implants for many years, Barry has completed a Masters Degree in Implantology at Warwick University where he gained a distinction. He is currently a clinical lecturer to postgraduate MSc students at Warwick University, in addition to mentoring local dentists in this field.

Barry is a member and Implant Mentor for The Association of Dental Implantology and a fellow of The Royal Society of Medicine. He is also a Consultant Member of the British Society of Oral Implantology. You can find him on

Dentists opening hours:

Monday to Friday, 9.00am – 5.30pm
Evening and Saturday appointments by arrangement.

Brighton Dental Practice:

14 Brunswick Place
Hove, Brighton
East Sussex, BN3 1NA

Dental Blog

How Smoking Affects Your Smile

Understanding tooth whitening

Get Mouth Aware This November

Everything you ever wanted to know about teeth – Part 2

Everything you ever wanted to know about teeth – Part 1

A Short Guide to Dental Implants

Electric vs Manual Toothbrushes: Which should you buy?

Understanding gum disease

Celebrating National Smile Month

Are you brushing your teeth wrong?

A cure for morning breath?

Sugar-free drinks - more harm than good?

New year’s dental resolutions

5 ways to best prevent mouth cancer

Dental Implants in Just One Day

5 reasons oral hygiene matters more than you think

Everything you need to know about getting a filling

Afraid of the dentist? Here are 5 tips to ease dental fear

Three important takeaways from National Smile Month

Dentistry and eating disorders

Hygiene – the top priority for dental surgeries

Tailored tooth whitening – always a good thing?

Gum disease survey highlights smoking dangers

Gum disease survey finds better advice recall rates